Many of the quotes below help us to understand more about how Hopper viewed his work. It also helps to explain why he chose the styles that he chose, plus his views towards the rise of Abstract Expressionists like Mark Rothko and Jackson Pollock.

Well, I've always been interested in approaching a big city in a train, and I can't exactly describe the sensations, but they're entirely human and perhaps have nothing to do with aesthetics.

Great art is the outward expression of an inner life in the artist, and this inner life will result in his personal vision of the world.

The trend in some of the contemporary movements in art, but by no means all, seems to deny this ideal and to me appears to lead to a purely decorative conception of painting.

Great art is the outward expression of an inner life in the artist, and this inner life will result in his personal vision of the world.

If you could say it in words there would be no reason to paint.

After all, we are not French and never can be, and any attempt to be so is to deny our inheritance and to try to impose upon ourselves a character that can be nothing but a veneer upon the surface.

If the technical innovations of the Impressionists led merely to a more accurate representation of nature, it was perhaps of not much value in enlarging their powers of expression.

No amount of skillful invention can replace the essential element of imagination.

Maybe I am not very human - what I wanted to do was to paint sunlight on the side of a house.

More of me comes out when I improvise.

I find linseed oil and white lead the most satisfactory mediums.

The only real influence I've ever had was myself.

In general it can be said that a nation's art is greatest when it most reflects the character of its people.

In its most limited sense, modern, art would seem to concern itself only with the technical innovations of the period.

I trust Winsor and Newton and I paint directly upon it.

The question of the value of nationality in art is perhaps unsolvable.